Funny story about my travels around the world on Google Street View: The hubby called our girls and showed them pictures of four places in the world he’s been to (He’s done quite a bit of travelling around the world back in the day).

He asked where they’d like him to take us next year. They looked at the pictures and beamed as they excitedly called me, “Mom, look, you’ve been to all these places!” Their father looked confused, “No, she hasn’t! I have!” They looked up at him from the computer screen and explained, “Mom went to these places on Google Street View!” He wasn’t about to be one-upped, “But Daddy has been there for real!” I walked in then, “But I feel like I have been there for real!”

In a way, Google Street View has scratched a weird travel itch I’ve had for as long as I can remember. I remember looking at maps as a little girl, wishing I could visit all those places one after another. I’ve done quite a bit of travelling myself for real also, but always found the hassle a bit inconvenient.

In one of my real life travels in my 20s, I journeyed to a dreamy, hard-to-get-to, far away village in Northeast Brazil–A place that only the adventurous back then dared go.

It rained the whole time my best friend and I were there. The Bed & Breakfast only had wet towels because they didn’t have dryers and had to dry everything on clotheslines. Wet towels, people! At least I had my coffee!

I recently “went back” there on Google Street View and finally saw it better because it wasn’t raining, and my towels are nice and dry here at home. The Society of Adventurous People kicked me out for being a fraud, though.

There’s something about Street View that can give us a sense of what it feels like to be there.

Last weekend I spent some time in the streets of Nepal, but while browsing the temples, markets, people watching, listening to the Nepali radio gave me a taste of what it would feel like to actually be there, it was actually when I walked away from my computer–and felt different–that the experience made me feel like I had “travelled.” My perception of my life, and even objects in my home, had been somehow “remapped” as I looked at my surroundings with “rebooted” eyes.

Here’s a trip to Jericoacoara (the hard-to-get-to way back when village) on me:

Make sure you listen to some lazy beach songs in Brazilian Portuguese like this one as you “travel:”

 

 

 

Veronica Shticks Anderson grew up homeschooled between two worlds: American and Brazilian, which taught her to appreciate both obvious and subtle differences in diverse peoples, cultures and languages. She created “The Shticks” in her mid-teens to satirize and just plain poke fun at real life situations that she found humor and inspiration in.

Veronica taught English for 13 years at one of the most prestigious languages schools in Brazil (Yazigi), founded a seminar company and studied marketing, photography, graphic design and video-making but her passion has always been portraying real-life situations with minimalistic characters.

Through the years Veronica refined The Shticks from her youth’s sketchy stick people drawings to more stylized characters who depict not only humor but also wisdom, cultural, social and spiritual stories. She uses photo-manipulation and videos to aid in putting The Shticks in creative settings for her stories.

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